Identifier

etd-04152011-150931

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Theory, Policy, and Practice

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

This dissertation explores the reasons that African American students participate at lower levels in foreign language programs in terms of taking courses and majoring and minoring in foreign languages. The primary foreign language that it explores is Spanish, and its findings suggest that the introduction of the language devoid of the influence of Afro-diasporic linkages to Spanish culture leads to the topic being taught in abstraction, therefore causing a lack of interest among African American students. As this study shows, a teacher's thinking about cultural and racial difference is often intimately woven into their disciplinary training, and as a result, the convergence of these influences affects a professor's ability to provide culturally responsive service and a student's desire to engage both the teacher and the subject area. Integrating relevant foreign language theory and Afro-diasporic literature this dissertation conducts inquiry into pedagogical approaches for attracting African American students into the area of foreign languages.

Date

2011

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Mitchell, Roland

Included in

Education Commons

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