Identifier

etd-0911101-173205

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test a new method for presenting information on the internet in a format that enhances adaptive learning and transfer to real-world applications. This web-based training method, called Cognitive Toolboxes (Mathews, 2001) involves analyzing course content into goal-based categories (toolboxes) linked to sets of knowledge facets (tools) and applications (cases). Three experiments examined the effects of internet access to different aspects of toolbox content (tools, toolbox names and cases) on subsequent application of the material to real-world problems. Results show that access to the organizational aspects of the method (tools organized into toolboxes) facilitated transfer for class members. Upper level undergraduate students not enrolled in the course demonstrated high levels of far transfer only when they were exposed to all of the cognitive toolbox contents (tools, toolbox names and cases) and were required to apply the material to solve their own personal problems. Memory of the knowledge facets (tools) was equivalent whether students developed their own organizational scheme or used the one provided by the course instructor (toolbox names).

Date

2001

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Robert C. Mathews

Included in

Psychology Commons

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