Identifier

etd-07102014-090253

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Education

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

This dissertation presents a qualitative of a study utilizing non-fiction African-American Folktales with struggling readers in second, third, and fifth grades. The study was conducted to explore how teachers, reading/library media specialists, and students utilize a variety of non-fiction folktales in their classrooms and the library media center. From this topic the following research questions were devised. The researcher discovered the challenges that teachers are faced with the implementation of folktales, how is folktales aligned with the (CCSS) Common Core State Standards, what role do heroes play in folktales, and what traits and/or characteristics would students prefer their hero to have. This qualitative study was conducted due to a curriculum change on the local, state, and national levels. Implications of these findings through process and product are discussed in this study. The results of this study indicate that the Common Core State Standards curriculum guide need to be revised and the selection of folktale stories in the curriculum need to be increased in the library and the classrooms in order for education to improve.

Date

2014

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Cheek, Earl H.

Included in

Education Commons

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