Identifier

etd-11142006-163133

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Counseling

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

This study examined the impact of student engagement on persistence decisions of Black males attending a predominately White public institution in the South. The phenomenon of Black male student persistence at predominately White public institutions is multifaceted and complex. Many Black males enter predominately White campuses lacking the requisite background and experiences deemed necessary and important to student success and persistence. The role of improving persistence is shared by many with much responsibility placed on the students and the institution. Upon entering a predominately White campus there are several institutional factors identified in research that play a critical role in student persistence. For the purposes of this study the factors influencing persistence are classified into Student Factors and Institutional Factors. Student factors are the dimensions of persistence over which the student has some degree of influence. Institutional factors are the dimensions of persistence over which the institution has control. This study was designed to empower Black males attending Kappa University and to encourage them to take more of a commanding role in their persistence. Persistence of Black males is multidimensional and requires support from family, community, faculty, peers and administrators. The findings of this study identified the importance of student engagement on persistence decisions of Black males attending Kappa University. The results provide Black male students, faculty, and administrators with practical advice on how to improve the chances of persistence for this group.

Date

2006

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

S. Kim MacGregor

Included in

Education Commons

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