Identifier

etd-07012014-080052

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Parental anxiety is a well-known factor that contributes to the development of anxiety in children. However, little is known about how specific parental factors influence the development and trajectory of childhood anxiety. There is also a paucity of research on separation anxiety disorder specifically. Complicating matters, children who suffer from clinically significant separation anxiety tend to be younger and thus it is harder to obtain accurate information from this age group. The purpose of the present study was to determine the mechanism through which parental factors such as somatization, anxiety sensitivity, and separation anxious behaviors might influence the development of anxiety in young children (specifically separation anxiety). As a result, 50 children and their mothers completed measures asking about demographic variables, internalizing problems, anxiety sensitivity, and somatization. The results showed that only parental separation anxious behaviors uniquely influenced separation anxious behaviors in children. Results and implications of these findings may be used to direct further examination of influential parental factors and inform treatment by targeting anxious parental behaviors.

Date

2013

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Davis, Thompson E III

Included in

Psychology Commons

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