Identifier

etd-05272016-184155

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Music

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

This research explores virtual reality as a medium for live concert performance. I have realized compositions in which the individual performing on stage uses a VR head-mounted display complemented by other performance controllers to explore a composed virtual space. Movements and objects within the space are used to influence and control sound spatialization and diffusion, musical form, and sonic content. Audience members observe this in real-time, watching the performer's journey through the virtual space on a screen while listening to spatialized audio on loudspeakers variable in number and position. The major artistic challenge I will explore through this activity is the relationship between virtual space and musical form. I will also explore and document the technical challenges of this activity, resulting in a shareable software tool called the Multi-source Ambisonic Spatialization Interface (MASI), which is useful in creating a bridge between VR technologies and associated software, ambisonic spatialization techniques, sound synthesis, and audio playback and effects, and establishes a unique workflow for working with sound in virtual space.

Date

2016

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Beck, Stephen David

Included in

Music Commons

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