Identifier

etd-04052005-222449

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Researchers have developed and demonstrated the effectiveness of a number of interventions to manage disruptive behavior in the dental setting. However, these treatments vary in terms of their effectiveness, invasiveness, effort to implement, and acceptability to families. This study evaluated the effects of noncontingent escape for reducing disruptive behavior in a pediatric dental setting. Within a multiple baseline design across subjects, five children were provided response-independent breaks via an automated cuing device. Results demonstrated reductions in escape-related behaviors (e.g., crying, body movements) for all children. Additionally, the intervention was implemented with high integrity and was favorably rated by the dental patients.

Date

2005

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Mary Lou Kelley

Included in

Psychology Commons

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