Identifier

etd-07202011-173312

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Although many studies have detailed the maladies imposed by Hurricane Katrina, little work has examined potential benefits gleaned in the wake of the storm. Posttraumatic growth, a construct receiving increased attention in the literature, describes personal betterment or development following a traumatic event in areas such as perceived changes in self, a changed sense of relations with others, and a changed philosophy of life. Researchers have demonstrated a relation between posttraumatic growth and varying factors, including religious coping. The current study established a relation between religious coping and posttraumatic growth in a sample of hurricane-exposed women in Southeastern Louisiana and attempted to identify mediators of that relation. Results indicated that social support was not related to religious coping or posttraumatic growth and therefore did not mediate the relation between the two. However, in the final model, cognitive processing fully mediated the relation between religious coping and posttraumatic growth, such that religious coping would have no effect on posttraumatic growth were it not for its relation to cognitive processing.

Date

2011

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Kelley, Mary Lou

Included in

Psychology Commons

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