Identifier

etd-06032007-180334

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Error Management Training (EMT) is a method of training that encourages trainees to make errors during training and to view those errors as beneficial for learning. Previous research has shown support for the benefits of EMT on metacognition, emotion control, intrinsic motivation and transfer performance compared to traditional error avoidant training. Also, previous research has found support for the mediating effects of metacognition and emotion control on the training type (i.e., EMT vs. error avoidant) and transfer performance relationship. However, previous research has not determined whether the increased metacognition, emotion control, and intrinsic motivation of EMT individuals has its effects on transfer performance through only increased knowledge or whether the effects are partially independent of knowledge differences. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine whether the increased metacognition, emotion control, and intrinsic motivation that result from EMT influence transfer performance holding constant any differences in knowledge acquisition. The proposed investigation manipulated the knowledge that individuals acquired from the training such that participants in the EMT group and an error-tailored avoidant group were exposed to the same information during training. These two groups were compared to participants in a control group who received error avoidant training. Consistent with the hypotheses, participants in the EMT group had higher levels of metacognition, emotion control and intrinsic motivation than participants in the error-tailored avoidant group. Results of the study suggested that participants in the EMT group had more task knowledge than participants in the error avoidant group, but did not differ from participants in the error-tailored avoidant group. Similar to previous studies, the current study showed that participants in the EMT condition demonstrated higher levels of transfer performance than the error avoidant or the error-tailored avoidant training conditions. A comparison of the EMT and the error avoidant training groups showed that the effect on transfer performance was partially mediated by task knowledge and a comparison of the EMT and the error-tailored avoidant groups indicated that the effect on transfer performance was mediated by emotion control. Implications, limitations, and areas for future research are discussed.

Date

2007

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Jason Hicks

Included in

Psychology Commons

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