Identifier

etd-05262013-124909

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Management (Business Administration)

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Empowerment has long been believed to positively influence workplace outcomes such as performance and satisfaction, but empirical and anecdotal evidence suggest this influence is frequently weak. The present study explores the theoretical links among aspects of structural and psychological empowerment, challenge and hindrance stress appraisals, and employee performance and well-being within workplace settings. Hypotheses were tested with data obtained from individual employees and their supervisors from a diverse range of industries and organizations. Results demonstrate that accountability positively affects appraisals of challenge and hindrance stress; felt hindrance stress adversely affects employee well-being; proactive personality moderates the relationship between authority-sharing and challenge stress; and locus of control moderates the relationship between empowerment practices and challenge stress appraisal. These findings broaden the focus of prior research by addressing why the so-called “magic spell” of empowerment may sometimes fail to improve performance and well-being.

Date

2013

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Richardson, Hettie A.

Included in

Business Commons

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