Identifier

etd-04022015-164836

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Human Resource Education and Workforce Development

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Abstract The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether or not selected demographic, academic, and institutional characteristics influence the decision of admitted transfer students to enroll in a research-extensive university in the southeastern region of the United States. The transfer student population is an untapped student population that could help benefit many universities. If these students are targeted like potential freshmen, then universities can increase their enrollment. Being able to identify the correct characteristics for potential transfer students would help conserve resources and maximize the incoming transfer student population. This study used the standards of a research-extensive university in the Southeastern region of the United States to identify transfer students who were admitted and either enrolled or did not enroll. A transfer student was defined as a student with at least 30 hours of college course work, a college-level English, a college-level math, and a minimum 2.5 GPA. The population came from the summer 2013-spring 2014 academic semesters. There were 12 independent variables provided by the Office of Enrollment Management and input into a computerized statistics program. Using logistic regression, the researcher was able to identify two characteristics that were statistically significant in correctly classifying enrollment status. Residence and having a higher education degree correctly classified 77.5% of the transfer student population. The other variables that were statistically significant were the variable multi-racial, transfer hours attempted, and transfer hours earned. The researcher recommended that surveys be conducted to determine why students complete a higher education degree and get admitted, but do not enroll in university. The researchers also recommended working with different ethnicities to determine why multi-racial students have a different enrollment pattern than the other ethnicities. Research also needs to be conducted concerning the role transfer parent alumni have on whether or not a student will or will not enroll after being admitted to the university.

Date

2015

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Burnett, Michael F

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