Identifier

etd-07102015-160750

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) are two of the most prevalent childhood disorders, and the co-occurrence of these disorders is associated with an exacerbation of certain behavioral difficulties such as opposition, defiance, and anger when compared to the independent presentation of either disorder. Several researchers have demonstrated that anxiety may buffer against oppositional behavior by inhibiting responses that may lead to aversive consequences. Thus, the current study sought to examine the potentially suppressing role of anxiety when symptoms of ADHD and ODD are both present. A hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to determine the extent to which anxiety moderates moderated the relationship between symptoms of ADHD and ODD in a sample of 1409 clinic-referred children. It was hypothesized that increased levels of anxiety would attenuate the relationship between the two disorders and would be associated with decreased levels of ODD. No significant findings were revealed during the regression, indicating that anxiety did not have an effect on the relationship between ADHD and symptoms of ODD in this model.

Date

2015

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Kelley, Mary Lou

Included in

Psychology Commons

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