Identifier

etd-04012010-110403

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Management (Business Administration)

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

This dissertation investigates the antecedents and outcomes of task and relationship conflict in subordinates and supervisors relations. Based on abusive supervision studies and the justice framework, I proposed that the relationship between abusive supervision and task conflict is mediated by procedural justice, and that the relationship between abusive supervision and relationship conflict is mediated by interactional justice. Based on emotional intelligence theory, I also proposed that these mediation processes are moderated by an individual’s emotion management ability (EMA). Finally, I anticipated that relationship conflict elicits more detrimental effect on employees’ organizational citizenship and workplace deviance behaviors. A total of 310 employees and their supervisors in a large hospital participated in this study. The results demonstrated that procedural justice fully mediates the relationship between abusive supervision and task conflict. Interactional justice fully mediates the relationship between abusive supervision and relationship conflict. An employee’s EMA moderates these relationships, such that individuals with higher EMA are more sensitive to repaying the favors that they have received. Lastly, relationship conflict is more damaging to organizational functioning than task conflict, such that the impact of relationship conflict on organizational citizenship and workplace deviance behaviors is significantly stronger. Implications and future directions are discussed.

Date

2010

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Kluemper,Donald H.

Included in

Business Commons

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